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This article is part of the supplement: Canadian Society of Allergy and Clinical Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting 2011

Open Access Meeting abstract

Vitamin D levels in peanut allergic children

Adam Fowlie1*, Laura Kim1, Trefford L Simpson2 and Harold Kim13

  • * Corresponding author: Adam Fowlie

Author Affiliations

1 University of Western Ontario, Canada

2 University of Waterloo, Canada

3 McMaster University, Canada

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Allergy, Asthma & Clinical Immunology 2011, 7(Suppl 2):A8  doi:10.1186/1710-1492-7-S2-A8

The electronic version of this article is the complete one and can be found online at: http://www.aacijournal.com/content/7/S2/A8


Published:14 November 2011

© 2011 Fowlie et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Background

The prevalence of peanut allergy is increasing. The reasons for this are not entirely known. A factor may be vitamin D (Vit D).

Methods

This study was performed in a referral allergist’s office in Ontario. Prospectively, all patients (<18 years old) with peanut allergy who were tested for peanut specific IgE (PN IgE) also had Vit D measured. All measurements were done between December 2010 and May 2011. The Vit D measure was 25-hydroxy vitamin D. Patients were divided into three groups: deficient (less than 25 nmol/L), insufficient (25-75 nmol/L) and sufficient (75-250 nmol/L). Vit D levels were compared to PN IgE, sex, age, body mass index (BMI) and other allergies.

Results

Fifty peanut allergic patients were included. The mean Vit D level of the patients was 73.8 nmol/L and the 95% confidence interval was 69.6 - 75.7 nmol/L. One patient (2%) had deficient and thirty-one (62%) of the patients had insufficient Vit D levels. Nineteen (38%) had Vit D levels in the sufficient range. There was no correlation between Vit D levels and PN IgE or BMI. Generalized linear modeling showed that vit D levels were predicted by age and sex (p=0.04 & p=0.002, respectively).

Conclusions

Two percent of our patients had deficient Vit D levels while 62% of our patients had insufficient Vit D levels. These levels were statistically associated with age and sex. Insufficiency of Vit D may play a role in peanut allergy.